Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: May 2015

Small Arms and Light Weapons

During the forthcoming open debate on small arms and light weapons, Member States should recognize and commit to the inclusion of women in policy making, treaty negotiations and discussions on disarmament, arms control, arms trade and military spending, including by implementing OP 12 of SCR 2117 (2013), as well as ensuring women’s participation in efforts to combat and eradicate small arms and light weapons in line with OP 14 of SCR 2122 (2013). States should also be encouraged to ratify and implement the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). Article 7 (4) of the ATT, requires the exporting State Party to take into account the risk of conventional arms being used to commit or facilitate serious acts of gender-based violence or serious action of violence against women and children. States should also be encouraged to support the proposed Sustainable Development Goal 16.4 on reducing illicit arms flows. The Council should fully implement relevant provisions of SCR 2122 (2013), specifically OP 4 which calls for women’s participation to be a cross-cutting issue across all mandate components, including in all aspects of disarmament, demobilization and arms control.

Libya

The Council will be considering the report on the UN mission in Libya (UNSMIL) in the context of a tenuous security situation, increasing attacks on activists, the threat posed by armed groups and illicit arms proliferation, and concern regarding instability within the government. The reports published in February represent good practice in terms of attention to key women, peace and security issues, by specifically highlighting instances where women activists were targeted for engaging in efforts to promote women’s participation, empowerment and realization of human rights. In its discussions, the Council should:
  • Support women’s full and equal participation in all political processes, national dialogue, constitution-drafting, and reconstruction efforts. The Libyan government should ensure that women’s role in DDR and SSR is promoted, and capacity is built to recruit and expand female participation in the police force.
  • Recognize women’s and girls’ particular protection needs and provide training for all security personnel to identify, respond to and protect individuals from gender-based threats and abuses. Particular attention should be paid to activists, who are at particular risk of intimidation and threats.
  • Urge accountability for ongoing crimes and call on the Libyan authorities to protect all foreign nationals, regardless of immigration status, from violence, exploitation, threats and abuses. Ensure that all detainees are treated humanely, receive necessary medical treatment and are protected from torture and other violations, including SGBV.

The Council will be considering the report on the UN mission in Libya (UNSMIL) in the context of a tenuous security situation, increasing attacks on activists, the threat posed by armed groups and illicit arms proliferation, and concern regarding instability within the government. The reports published in February represent good practice in terms of attention to key women, peace and security issues, by specifically highlighting instances where women activists were targeted for engaging in efforts to promote women’s participation, empowerment and realization of human rights. In its discussions, the Council should:

  • Support women’s full and equal participation in all political processes, national dialogue, constitution-drafting, and reconstruction efforts. The Libyan government should ensure that women’s role in DDR and SSR is promoted, and capacity is built to recruit and expand female participation in the police force.
  • Recognize women’s and girls’ particular protection needs and provide training for all security personnel to identify, respond to and protect individuals from gender-based threats and abuses. Particular attention should be paid to activists, who are at particular risk of intimidation and threats.
  • Urge accountability for ongoing crimes and call on the Libyan authorities to protect all foreign nationals, regardless of immigration status, from violence, exploitation, threats and abuses. Ensure that all detainees are treated humanely, receive necessary medical treatment and are protected from torture and other violations, including SGBV.

Somalia

The Security Council is expected to renew the mandate of the United Nations Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) and will be discussing the latest Secretary-General’s report on the implementation of the mandate of the UNSOM. The Council must continue to call on all actors to ensure women are protected from sexual violence and exploitation, including sexual exploitation and abuse as specified in SCR 2102 (2013). Council members should promote women’s full participation in all aspects of UNSOM’s mandate and detail the specific steps the UN will take to support such activities, as specified in SCR 2102 (2013) OP 11. Finally, the Council should fully integrate a gender perspective across all humanitarian efforts.

South Sudan

The Security Council will be renewing the mandate of the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and continuing to discuss the broader situation in South Sudan. As civilians, particularly women and girls, continue to bear the brunt of the conflict, including widespread displacement and human rights violations, the Council should focus on strengthening the human rights component of the mandate, ensuring the mission has the logistical support and resources needed to carry out its protection of civilians’ mandate; addressing the ongoing sexual and gender-based violence; and promoting women’s participation and issues in all aspects of the situation, including peacebuilding and community leadership in protection of civilians (PoC) sites. Council members are urged to take the following actions:
  • Gender and Women’s Protection Advisors should be deployed to prevent violations and abuses committed against women including guaranteeing that medical and psychosocial services are available and accessible to survivors of SGBV (SCR 2127 (2013)) and ensuring that the mission’s protection strategy is inclusive of women, as per SCR 2187 (2014) and SCR 2122 (2013).
  • Reporting arrangements, accountability mechanisms and justice systems that address the needs of SGBV survivors should be accelerated and established as per SCR 2187 (2014) and SCR 2106 (2013).
  • The needs and voices of women IDPs and refugees should be incorporated into the design and delivery of humanitarian assistance, as well as the design and operation of protection of civilian sites.
  • Ensure that UNMISS reports on its implementation of all aspects of women, peace and security, including its protection strategy, deployment of WPAs and the participation of women and women’s civil society organizations in all efforts to resolve the conflict and implement peace agreements.
  • Ensure UNMISS continues to effectively provide protection to the Monitoring and Verification Teams, as per the mandate, that consider the safety of citizens, especially women, in reporting violations of the CoH.
  • Encourage UNMISS to remain committed to the full and effective participation of women in decision-making processes at all levels, from PoC management committees to the formal peacemaking process.

The Security Council will be renewing the mandate of the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and continuing to discuss the broader situation in South Sudan. As civilians, particularly women and girls, continue to bear the brunt of the conflict, including widespread displacement and human rights violations, the Council should focus on strengthening the human rights component of the mandate, ensuring the mission has the logistical support and resources needed to carry out its protection of civilians’ mandate; addressing the ongoing sexual and gender-based violence; and promoting women’s participation and issues in all aspects of the situation, including peacebuilding and community leadership in protection of civilians (PoC) sites. Council members are urged to take the following actions:

  • Gender and Women’s Protection Advisors should be deployed to prevent violations and abuses committed against women including guaranteeing that medical and psychosocial services are available and accessible to survivors of SGBV (SCR 2127 (2013)) and ensuring that the mission’s protection strategy is inclusive of women, as per SCR 2187 (2014) and SCR 2122 (2013).
  • Reporting arrangements, accountability mechanisms and justice systems that address the needs of SGBV survivors should be accelerated and established as per SCR 2187 (2014) and SCR 2106 (2013).
  • The needs and voices of women IDPs and refugees should be incorporated into the design and delivery of humanitarian assistance, as well as the design and operation of protection of civilian sites.
  • Ensure that UNMISS reports on its implementation of all aspects of women, peace and security, including its protection strategy, deployment of WPAs and the participation of women and women’s civil society organizations in all efforts to resolve the conflict and implement peace agreements.
  • Ensure UNMISS continues to effectively provide protection to the Monitoring and Verification Teams, as per the mandate, that consider the safety of citizens, especially women, in reporting violations of the CoH.
  • Encourage UNMISS to remain committed to the full and effective participation of women in decision-making processes at all levels, from PoC management committees to the formal peacemaking process.

Syria

The Council is expected to consider the situation in Syria, with a particular focus on the current humanitarian situation. In many cases, parties to the conflict are preventing necessary humanitarian services from reaching critical areas in need. In the context of reporting, in accordance with SCR 2139 (2014) and SCR 2165 (2014), the Council should call for:
  • Gender-sensitive reports and briefings, which provide information on the scope of the situation for women, men, girls and boys and the inclusion of particularly marginalized groups, such as women and adolescent girls who head households, and/or women who have disabilities or are care-givers of persons with disabilities.
  • Investigations into the sexual exploitation of Syrian women and girls by aid workers in exchange for goods and services.
  • OCHA to work with civil society organizations, to devise a localized relief effort reflective of each area’s unique needs and characteristics.
  • The Government of Syria to expand humanitarian access in accordance with SCR 2139 (2014) and SCR 2165 (2014).
  • The establishment of a monitoring mechanism, which includes international and Syrian civil society organizations, to oversee and report on the distribution of humanitarian aid relief.
  • Strengthened efforts to utilize sex and age disaggregated data, ensuring responses meet the needs of displaced women and girls, and provide easily accessible public transportation to facilitate safe access to information and services.
  • The implementation of SCR 2122 (2013) to ensure women’s participation in all political efforts to resolve the conflict, the inclusion of a Technical Expert Support Team comprised of 50% women in the next rounds of peace talks, the assignment of capable gender advisers to the UN Special Envoy and negotiating teams, and stronger consultation of grassroots women groups and civil society representatives to inform the content and outcome of the negotiations.

The Council is expected to consider the situation in Syria, with a particular focus on the current humanitarian situation. In many cases, parties to the conflict are preventing necessary humanitarian services from reaching critical areas in need. In the context of reporting, in accordance with SCR 2139 (2014) and SCR 2165 (2014), the Council should call for:

  • Gender-sensitive reports and briefings, which provide information on the scope of the situation for women, men, girls and boys and the inclusion of particularly marginalized groups, such as women and adolescent girls who head households, and/or women who have disabilities or are care-givers of persons with disabilities.
  • Investigations into the sexual exploitation of Syrian women and girls by aid workers in exchange for goods and services.
  • OCHA to work with civil society organizations, to devise a localized relief effort reflective of each area’s unique needs and characteristics.
  • The Government of Syria to expand humanitarian access in accordance with SCR 2139 (2014) and SCR 2165 (2014).
  • The establishment of a monitoring mechanism, which includes international and Syrian civil society organizations, to oversee and report on the distribution of humanitarian aid relief.
  • Strengthened efforts to utilize sex and age disaggregated data, ensuring responses meet the needs of displaced women and girls, and provide easily accessible public transportation to facilitate safe access to information and services.
  • The implementation of SCR 2122 (2013) to ensure women’s participation in all political efforts to resolve the conflict, the inclusion of a Technical Expert Support Team comprised of 50% women in the next rounds of peace talks, the assignment of capable gender advisers to the UN Special Envoy and negotiating teams, and stronger consultation of grassroots women groups and civil society representatives to inform the content and outcome of the negotiations.