Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2013

Burundi

In its discussions of the expected report on the UN Office in Burundi (BNUB), the Security Council should ensure the assessment of the implementation of the benchmarks requested in S/2012/584 contains complete analysis of the gender component of the work of BNUB and peace consolidation work broadly in Burundi. Only two indicators reference gender explicitly, however gender-disaggregated data and gender specific evaluation is crucial in order to ensure peacebuilding efforts are successful, thus additional analysis should be undertaken. Further, the Council should follow-up on the May 2012 visit of the UN ASG for Human Rights to Burundi to push for justice for survivors of crimes, including crimes of sexual violence.

Central African Republic

The mandate of the UN office in the Central African Republic (BINUCA) is set to be extended per SCR 2027. In light of the current instability, massive internal displacement, and increasing violence, the Council should ensure that protection of civilians, in particular of women, and respect for human rights and international humanitarian law is central to all action on the situation. The Council should call for the end to human rights violations, including sexual violence, perpetrated by forces involved in the current dispute. Further, given the recent visit of the SRSG on Sexual Violence in Conflict, the Council should follow-up on commitments made in the two Joint Communiqués between the UN and the Government as well as on the status of efforts to address impunity and provision of services for survivors of sexual and gender-based violence.

Counterterrorism

The Council’s expected debate on counterterrorism should specifically address how counterterrorism measures by UN bodies and Member States comply with international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law, particularly regarding gender considerations. Council members should ask what steps are being taken to ensure that counterterrorism measures do not hinder gender equality, and urge Member States to include human rights components in their relevant reporting.

The Council’s expected debate on counterterrorism should specifically address how counterterrorism measures by UN bodies
and Member States comply with international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law, particularly regarding gender considerations. Council members should ask what steps are being taken to ensure that counterterrorism measures do not hinder gender equality, and urge Member States to include human rights components in their relevant reporting.

Cyprus

The Security Council will consider the report of the Secretary-General and renew the mandate of the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP). The Council should call for the inclusion of women in peace negotiations and strengthen references to the participation of civil society in the peace process (S/RES/2058, OP 3(d)), in line with the recommendations in S/2010/603, para. 43.

Democratic Republic of the Congo

The human rights and humanitarian crisis in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has sharply worsened over recent months. In its discussions of the situation, the Council should conduct a thorough review of MONUSCO’s performance on protection of civilians with a view to improving its capacity to provide effective protection to populations at risk. This review should inform SC efforts to clearly and strictly establish expectations on effective implementation of the protection mandate. Further, the Council should ensure that MONUSCO forces take all practical measures to protect the civilian population against human rights abuses, including in IDP camps, and provide sanctuary in MONUSCO premises to human rights defenders at serious risk.

Rule of Law

During its discussion of the Secretary-General’s report on rule of law (RoL) in conflict-affected situations in January 2013, the Council should call for comprehensive strategies to investigate and prosecute crimes under international law to ensure justice, truth and reparation for victims. This must include crimes of sexual and gender-based violence, and universal jurisdiction should be invoked when necessary. States should enact national legislation defining crimes under international law, including crimes of sexual and gender-based violence, and must move to re-establish the rule of law and rebuild the national justice system. Appropriate legal frameworks must be adopted to prevent discrimination against women and ensure their full and equal participation in RoL institutions. Discriminatory laws and measures must be repealed, including such that deny the legal provision of certain reproductive health services for women or criminalize medical procedures needed only by women (CEDAW General Recommendation 24). Effective victim and witness protection systems must be established. Vetting of national authorities, including the armed forces, should be carried out to suspend from their positions or not recruit those reasonably suspected of crimes under international law. The Council should recognize the important role of the ICC in ending impunity, particularly in relation to crimes of sexual and gender-based violence. The Council should call on all States to establish national action plans in full consultation with local and community women’s rights groups to implement SCR 1325.

During its discussion of the Secretary-General’s report on rule of law (RoL) in conflict-affected situations in January 2013, the Council should call for comprehensive strategies to investigate and prosecute crimes under international law to ensure justice, truth and reparation for victims. This must include crimes of sexual and gender-based violence, and universal jurisdiction
should be invoked when necessary. States should enact national legislation defining crimes under international law, including crimes of sexual and gender-based violence, and must move to re-establish the rule of law and rebuild the national justice system. Appropriate legal frameworks must be adopted to prevent discrimination against women and ensure their full and equal participation in RoL institutions. Discriminatory laws and measures must be repealed, including such that deny the legal provision of certain reproductive health services for women or criminalize medical procedures needed only by women (CEDAW General Recommendation 24). Effective victim and witness protection systems must be established. Vetting of national authorities, including the armed forces, should be carried out to suspend from their positions or not recruit those reasonably suspected of crimes under international law. The Council should recognize the important role of the ICC in ending impunity, particularly in relation to crimes of sexual and gender-based violence. The Council should call on all States to establish national action plans in full consultation with local and community women’s rights groups to implement SCR 1325.

Libya

The expected report on the UN mission in Libya (UNSMIL) should include information on women’s full and equal participation in the political process, reconciliation, and reconstruction efforts. The Security Council should press the Libyan Congress to ensure accountability for serious and ongoing crimes. The Council should call on the Libyan authorities to protect all foreign nationals, regardless of their immigration status, from violence, exploitation, threats and abuse; and ensure that all detainees are treated humanely, receive necessary medical treatment and are protected from torture and other ill-treatment, including sexual and gender-based violence.

Mali

In its discussion of the situation in Mali, the Council should support key elements regarding women’s participation in conflict prevention and resolution, and the cessation of human rights abuses, including sexual and gender-based violence. The UN presence to be established must be equipped with all the needed resources, including strong gender expertise, to independently monitor the adherence of all parties to the conflict to international humanitarian and human rights law, and must submit public and regular reports to the SC on its findings. The Security Council should make sure that the authorized military force of the African-led International Support Mission in Mali (AFISMA) mandated by SCR 2085 (2012) must be subjected to strict vetting procedures, and pre-deployment training should reach best practice standards, particularly regarding sexual violence in conflict. Concerted efforts must be made to ensure comprehensive protection of civilians, in particular women. There must also be an urgent upscale in specialized gender-based violence (GBV) service delivery, with humanitarian organizations leading the GBV response requiring continuous support from the GBV Sub-Cluster leadership.

Peacekeeping

In its expected debate on peacekeeping, the Council should specifically address whether there is sufficient senior–level gender expertise in missions and adequate analysis and recommendations regarding women, peace and security in all country and situation reporting; and adequate attention to all relevant aspects of women, peace and security in mission mandates.

Somalia

In discussing the expected reports from the African Union and the Secretary-General on the mission in Somalia (AMISOM), the SC should call on all armed actors to comply with international humanitarian law, and protect civilians, including women.The Council should inquire into women’s full participation in all efforts to find a political solution to the ongoing armed violence, and how a future UN presence would support such activities; and should follow-up on the establishment of a gender unit within the Somali Police Force. The monitoring group’s midterm briefing should include information on individuals or groups intentionally targeting civilians, including women, and recommend action as per SCR 2002 (OP 1).

Abyei / Darfur / South Sudan / Sudan

The Council is expected to receive reports on the UN mission in Abyei (UNISFA) and the UN mission in Darfur (UNAMID). Both reports should include gender analysis on SSR, RoL, and peacebuilding. Both missions should provide specific information on humanitarian concerns, efforts to address violations of women’s rights, including sexual violence, and ending impunity for these crimes. In its discussion of the situation in Darfur, the Council should call on the government of Sudan to immediately end attacks against civilians; step up efforts to end impunity for sexual violence, including by security forces, and grant UNAMID and UN entities unfettered access to all areas where civilians need protection.

Yemen

In its discussions of the situation in Yemen, the Council should request information on, and support women’s full engagement in, all efforts at national dialogue and reconciliation. It should press for an independent international investigation into serious violations of international human rights and humanitarian law committed by all sides.

In its regular work, the Council should ensure that all country reports and mandate renewals evaluate the level of protection and promotion of women’s human rights, as per SCRs 1325, 1820 (OP 9), 1888 (OP 11), 1889 (OP 5) and 1960 (OP 6, 13). Member States should inquire about any lack of such reporting.