Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: October 2010

Afghanistan

During the expected mandate renewal of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan, and in line with SCR 1890, the Security Council should ensure that its requested quarterly reports on ISAF operations are timely and include information on ISAF’s implementation of all SCRs on Women, Peace and Security. Also in line with SCR 1890, the Council is urged to review “progress by the Afghan Government in ending impunity and strengthening judicial institutions, the rule of law and respect for human rights within Afghanistan, including for women and girls”.

Central African Republic / Chad

The Security Council will consider a report on the situation in the region in the lead up to the withdrawal of the UN Mission to Central African Republic and Chad (MINURCAT), due to begin October 15. The capacity of the Chadian government to provide security for the civilian population in eastern Chad remains a major concern, particularly in light of ongoing insecurity and human rights violations, perpetrated with near total impunity. As stated in the Secretary-General’s previous report on MINURCAT, the plight of women and girls living in eastern Chad continues despite the promises of the Chadian authorities. The Council should inquire as to the measures that the Chadian government has put in place to protect all persons within its territory, including refugees from Darfur and displaced Chadians, from violations of international human rights and humanitarian law. The Chadian government must ensure that its own security forces do not commit crimes. The government should promptly formulate, disseminate and implement a detailed and transparent plan of action for civilian protection in eastern Chad. In particular it must urgently submit to the Council its plan for sustaining the Détachement intégré de sécurité (DIS) after MINURCAT’s departure, a plan that was required by 31 July 2010 (SCR 1923, OP5). It is essential that the Council maintain a high level of engagement in eastern Chad to ensure that the security situation does not deteriorate during the transition period and after the full withdrawal of MINURCAT due on 31 December.

Democratic Republic of the Congo

The continuing sexual and gender-based crimes perpetrated in the DRC, including attacks in the Walikale region, necessitate clear, strong action to ensure that the UN’s Mission, MONUSCO, fulfills its protection mandate. This is a priority given the joint DRC Government-UN assessment now underway to determine next steps regarding a possible MONUSCO drawdown, an update on which is due in October. In addition, efforts must be redoubled to combat the widespread impunity for gender and other crimes.

Haiti

During the expected mandate renewal of the UN mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), the Council must address the urgent and specific security concerns that women and girls continue to face. While gender crimes were a significant problem before the earthquake, the risks facing women and girls have grown more acute in the wake of the disaster. People continue to live in crowded, often insecure displacement sites, many of which have been infiltrated by armed gangs, and insufficient action has been taken to improve the safety of women and girls in these areas. MINUSTAH must work with the government of Haiti and Haitian civil society to develop a comprehensive security plan that addresses the urgent needs of women and identifies steps that will rebuild security structures in Haiti, based on the actions outlined in SCR 1927 (OP 4). Women’s human rights defenders must be meaningfully consulted to ensure such plans address their priority concerns. MINUSTAH must also support the government to ensure that women’s views are effectively reflected in rebuilding effort. In particular this requires additional, relevant technical and material support to the Ministry of the Women’s Affairs.

Peacebuilding

The Council will consider the report on Women and Peace-building (A/65/354 – S/2010/466) requested in SCR 1889 (OP 18). This report sets out a practical strategy to ensure women’s empowerment is supported and women’s rights are integrated in all aspects of post-conflict rebuilding and reconstruction. The report’s recommendations are particularly useful for making the UN’s approach to Women, Peace and Security matters more systematic.

Darfur / South Sudan / Sudan

During the Security Council mission to Sudan, the Council members must meet with women’s human rights defenders, including those seeking to engage in the ongoing peace processes. The Council should ensure it always meets with women’s human rights defenders on its missions (1325, OP15; reaffirmed in 1889, OP14). The expected report on UNMIS should address contingency plans for women’s protection over the next few months as well as detail how the UN will better support women’s security and participation in the long-term. The report should also include information on:
  • Disarmament operations which continue throughout Southern Sudan and have involved serious abuses against women and girls, including torture and other ill-treatment aimed at extracting information on the location of arms supplies. UNMIS must mobilize immediately to develop contingency plans for improving women’s protection in advance of the referendum, including through ensuring that humanitarian assistance is increased in the next few months.
  • Progress made, or lack thereof, of all parties and the UN, to protect women and girls from gender-based crimes and ensure access to remedy, including full reparations, for victims.
  • Services for survivors of sexual and gender-based crimes are virtually non-existent and urgently needed in both rural and urban areas throughout Southern Sudan. Currently, most services available, including clinical management of rape within the hospitals, is provided only at the state level requiring women and girls to walk or travel for hours or days to seek care.
Specific questions for the Council to raise include:
  • An evaluation of the effectiveness of the completed comprehensive strategy on sexual and gender-based violence prevention and response, as per the Secretary-General’s report on UNAMID (S/2010/382) of 14 July 2010, and requested in SCR 1935 (OP 18);
  • How the UN’s Analytical Inventory of Peacekeeping Practice: Addressing Conflict-Related Sexual Violence is applied.
  • Measures taken to ensure displaced women and girls have safe access to fuel and firewood.
  • How reintegration programs include young women associated with fighting forces, through education and training components.

During the Security Council mission to Sudan, the Council members must meet with women’s human rights defenders, including those seeking to engage in the ongoing peace processes. The Council should ensure it always meets with women’s human rights defenders on its missions (1325, OP15; reaffirmed in 1889, OP14). The expected report on UNMIS should address contingency plans for women’s protection over the next few months as well as detail how the UN will better support women’s security and participation in the long-term. The report should also include information on:

  • Disarmament operations which continue throughout Southern Sudan and have involved serious abuses against women and girls, including torture and other ill-treatment aimed at extracting information on the location of arms supplies. UNMIS must mobilize immediately to develop contingency plans for improving women’s protection in advance of the referendum, including through ensuring that humanitarian assistance is increased in the next few months.
  • Progress made, or lack thereof, of all parties and the UN, to protect women and girls from gender-based crimes and ensure access to remedy, including full reparations, for victims.
  • Services for survivors of sexual and gender-based crimes are virtually non-existent and urgently needed in both rural and urban areas throughout Southern Sudan. Currently, most services available, including clinical management of rape within the hospitals, is provided only at the state level requiring women and girls to walk or travel for hours or days to seek care.

Specific questions for the Council to raise include:

  • An evaluation of the effectiveness of the completed comprehensive strategy on sexual and gender-based violence prevention and response, as per the Secretary-General’s report on UNAMID (S/2010/382) of 14 July 2010, and requested in SCR 1935 (OP 18);
  • How the UN’s Analytical Inventory of Peacekeeping Practice: Addressing Conflict-Related Sexual Violence is applied.
  • Measures taken to ensure displaced women and girls have safe access to fuel and firewood.
  • How reintegration programs include young women associated with fighting forces, through education and training components.

Women Peace and Security

During the Open Debate the Council should take urgent steps to address gaps in implementation of its four resolutions on Women, Peace and Security, including by endorsing the global indicators requested in SCR 1889 (OP 17) and S/PRST/2010/8, and establishing a comprehensive and systematic Women, Peace and Security approach to all aspects of the Security Council’s work. This includes ensuring leadership on this issue within the Council, the provision of consistent information to the Council, and a clear set of good practice options on Women, Peace and Security for all of the Security Council’s actions. Specific steps for the UN system include substantial Women, Peace and Security expertise in the new entity, UN Women.